Divorce

The Law Office of Garnett Harrison, P.C. practices in the areas of family and marital law and dependency in Southeast Georgia and Northeast Florida. This practice includes divorce, paternity, modifications, custody, visitation and time-sharing, child support, alimony, equitable distribution, domestic violence hearings, child abuse and neglect. We also serve the needs of military divorce and family law clients at Kings Bay Naval Base.

Garnett Harrison has more than 30 years of experience in family law practice to assist you on issues such as:

  • Temporary or permanent child support, and alimony
  • Temporary or permanent child custody
  • Division of assets, debts and income
  • Enforcing child support, alimony and visitation schedule
  • Obtaining a portion of your spouse’s retirement in equitable distribution
Custody
There is no decision more important to a parent other than custody. Custody not only includes where children live but it includes access to children by both parents. A good lawyer who is able to develop and present your case is critical. The Court considers many factors in determining the primary custodian.

Military and Civil Service Divorce
Garnett Harrison’s dealing with military and civil service personnel over the years has given her the experience needed to obtain for you your share of military pension and retirement benefits as part of the marital estate regardless of being in active duty or already retired. Military spouses’ rights are recognized pursuant to Uniformed Services Former Spouses’ Protection Act

Alimony and Cohabitation
The judge has the authority to grant or deny alimony. Once alimony is granted it can change over time to be increased or decreased depending on many factors. Garnett Harrison will assist you to modify the alimony assignment, for example, upon the death, the remarriage of the spouse receiving the alimony, or cohabitation of an unmarried former spouse. The modification is based on the need of the receiving spouse and the other spouse”s ability to pay. The alimony could be granted on a permanent or temporary basis depending on the length of the marriage. Garnett Harrison can assist you with the procedures to obtain alimony or child support during a period of separation or abandonment without filing for a divorce.

Annulment
This is a process where a marriage is essentially set aside as if it never existed. The procedure for an annulment is similar to a divorce, except, according to the Official Code of Georgia may not be granted if children have been or are to be born as a result of the marriage.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I have to have “grounds” to be divorced?

No, you do not have to have “grounds” to get divorced in Georgia and Florida. Marriages can be dissolved based on “irreconcilable differences.” This is an “uncontested” divorce. There are multiple grounds that can be plead in a divorce, including, but not limited to Cruel Treatment, Adultery, Abandonment, Drug Abuse and Addiction. You should consult with an attorney who is knowledgeable about practice and pleading to determine what grounds, if any should be plead in your divorce.

 

Can my spouse and I get an uncontested divorce?

Yes, an uncontested divorce is one where both parties have agreed on all issues, including dividing property, child custody and visitation, and child support and alimony. There are documents that an experienced attorney can prepare for you to assist in completing an uncontested divorce.

 

Do I have to be separated from my spouse to get divorced?

Neither Georgia or Florida require parties to be separated prior to filing for divorce. In Georgia and Florida, you must be a resident of the county where the divorce is to be filed for six months prior to the filing of the divorce, with the exception of military service members in Georgia, who must be attached to the military base for one year prior to filing.

 

Can I get alimony?

Alimony is a support payment by one spouse to another which, based upon various factors may be appropriate in a particular case. Alimony is generally not available to a spouse who caused the dissolution of the marriage by their adultery or desertion. Alimony may be for a limited time period or until the spouse receiving alimony dies or remarries, or may be paid in one lump sum. Again, the court will review the Domestic Relations Financial Affidavit (which would have been completed during the divorce proceedings) when determining the issue of alimony. Factors the court will consider in determining alimony include the length of the marriage; health of each party; assets of each party; and the contributions of each party to homemaking, child raising, and career building of the other party.

 

Please also see “Divorce over 50” for additional considerations during divorce.